Health and Care InfoCenter

Unfortunately, your cat can’t tell you when he/she is sick like a child might.  If
your cat could speak, you would always know exactly what hurt, when to go to the vet, and
how to treat any minor ailments yourself.  But communication is possible if you watch
and listen carefully, so as cat guardians you must be especially perceptive to
notice any health problems and figure out what to do next.  Our Health and Care InfoCenter
strives to bring you up-to-date and quality information on all major aspects of cat health and care.
If you can not find what you are looking for here, submit your question to the
“Kitty Nurse” for a fast and accurate answer.

Information AT 21Cats: Visit our Cat Blog – a collection of the best guides and tips for everything A-Z for cats.

A
Abandoned Kittens
Abscesses
Acne
Aggression
Allergies In Cats
Allergies to Cats
Alopecia
Anal Sacs
Anemia
Arthritis
Artificial Breathing
Asthma
Appetite Stimulation
Aversion Techniques

B
Biting/Scratching
Bowls
Bronchitis

C
Cancer
Caring for Ferals
Carriers
Cat Beds
Cataracts
Cat Communication
Cat Grass
Catnip
Chewing Behaviors
Choking
Coccidia
Collars
Conjunctivitis
Common Cold
Constipation
CPR
Cystitis

D
Dandruff
Declawing
Dehydration
Dental Problems
Dental Health
Dermatitis
Diabetes
Diarrhea
Dominance

E
Ear Infections
Ear Mites
Eating Plants
Endocrine Alopecia

F
Feline Endocrine Alopecia
Feline Lower Urinary Tract Disorder
Feline Panleukopenia
Feline Urologic Syndrome
FeLV
Feral Cats
FIA
FIP
FIV
First Aid Kits
Fleas
Food/Eating Habits
Foster Care for Kittens

G
Gastritis
Giving Birth
Giving Medications
Grooming

H
Hairballs
Heart Disease
Heartworm
Heat
Hierarchy in Cats
Horner’s Syndrome
How to Find the Right Cat
How to Find the Right Vet
Human Pregnancy and Cats
Hyperthyroidism
Hypothyroidism

I
Improper Elimination
Incontinence
Indoor vs. Outdoor
Inflammatory Bowel Disease/Disorder
Internal Parasites
Introducing Two Cats

J
Jaundice

K
Kidney Disease
Kittens (Birthing Process)
Kitten Care
Kitten Development
Kitten Growth Stages

L
Leashes/Harnesses
Lintbrushes
Litterbox Issues

M
Marking
Matts
Milk and Cats
Monitoring Ferals
Motion Sickness
Moving with your Cat

N
Neutering
New Kitten @ Home

O
Obesity
Ocular Herpes
Otitis Externa
Outdoor Cats

P
Pancreatitis
Parasites
Pica
Playing
Pneumonia
Poisoning
Poisonous Items to Cats
Pregnancy
Psychogenic Alopecia

Q

R
Rabies
Ringworm

S
Scratching
Scratching Posts
Seizures
Sexing Kittens
Should I Get a Cat?
Socialization
Socializing Ferals
Spaying
Spraying
Stain/Odor Control
Stomach Problems
Stress

T
Taking a Temperature
Territorialism
Ticks
Toxoplasmosis
Toys
Training Techiques
Trapping Ferals
Traveling
Treats

U
Ulcers
Upper Respiratory Infections
Urethritis

V
Vaccines
Vaccine Related Sarcomas
Vestibular Disease
Vomiting

W
Warning Signs
Weight Loss
When to See a Vet
Winterizing Ferals
Worms

X

Y

Z

**Keep in mind that like any other research you do on your own, the information on this
site should serve as a supplement to professional care.  There is no substitute for a
veterinary exam if you feel your cat may be ill, so at the first sign of a problem you should
always make a vet appointment ASAP.